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Pom Pom: Untitled II

Untitled II’, is a subtle trip deeper into what makes Pom Pom tick. Essentially a direct sequel to ‘Untitled’, this LP is a black hole that you don’t see ahead of you until you’ve slipped into the event horizon.

Vril: Anima Mundi

This is straight up space music: aliens, black holes, astronauts, star ships. Contained are absolutely massive beats and bottomless synth pads. ‘Anima Mundi’ is acidic, burning away the rust to reveal the shiny underbelly of a rocket ship headed to a distant solar system. This is true stargazing music, made for asking the biggest questions of our existence.

Shinichi Atobe: Heat

Atobe certainly brought his A-game to the table on his most danceable record yet. Heat features all of the sonic touchstones that we’ve come to expect from his music and capitalizes on the best moments from the almost 20 years we’ve known him to exist.

Thomas Fehlmann: Los Lagos

It’s been a while since we’ve heard a solo project from the electronic music legend, and the wait has been well worth it. ‘Los Lagos’ is a testament to Fehlmann’s longevity as an artist and a peak at what he’s capable of as a songwriter and producer.

Vril: Haus

Vril continues to dumbfound with yet another loop-based release of stargazing, dubby techno with a fresh slice of ambient on the rim. Haus is simply phenomenal and anyone that says otherwise is a hater.

Oneohtrix Point Never: Age Of

Daniel Lopatin has been exploring our technological wasteland for years as Oneohtrix Point Never, but Age Of is definitely where it all comes into focus–this time with a pop slant.

DJ Koze: Knock Knock

On his new album, Koze explores a more psychedelic, layered sound palette, with each song sounding even richer than his last album, Amygdala. Knock Knock is like taking a bite of a handcrafted dark chocolate bar–equally bitter and sweet at the same time, a perfect blend of rawness and craft.

Jan Jelinek: Zwischen

Made by and featuring none other than strictly human sounds, warped and deconstructed until it falls in that uncanny valley of dissociative humanism. Jan Jelinek’s latest album ‘Zwischen’ can be considered an exercise in learning to find enjoyment and/or contentment in the intellectual and physical limitations of the human mind and body.